My “Field Trip” To Our Local Schaumburg Family History Center (FHC); Viewing Digital Films Designated For Viewing “Only” At A Family History Center

Hi Everyone,

With the recent announcement by FamilySearch that the microfilm ordering process will come to a halt on September 1, 2017, I thought it would be wise of me to take a “field trip” to the local Schaumburg Family History Center (FHC) near our library.

I had not been to the facility in quite a number of  years (sorry to admit that!).  However, I thought it was important for me to make a “field trip” there to better gauge what is related to the discontinuance of microfilm orders and to see what it is like to use their system to gain access to viewing digital data that is not viewable at home yet due to contractual obligations that limit such viewing “only” to a Family History Center (FHC).

So I dusted off all of my cobwebs for not having been recently to a local FHC and recently made the trip one evening last week.

Here is some key information about our local Schaumburg, IL FHC for those of you that may never have visited:

  • Address   –  1320 W. Schaumburg Road, IL 60194, part of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints building.
  • Phone  –  847-885-4130 (Always call in advance to be sure FHC is “open” with volunteers; don’t make a trip and discover they are closed or the volunteer(s) were unable to make it in.
  • FHC is located in the backside of the church building; entrance located there; push buzzer for someone to let you in.
  • Hours staffed by volunteers are Wednesday, 2pm to 9pm, Thursday, 4pm to 9pm, Saturday, 9am to 1pm.  (These hours appear to be significantly less from what I remember them years ago, especially the morning hours.)
  • Web site is https://familysearch.org/wiki/Schaumburg_Illinois_Family_History_Center
  • Visit the web site above to view a list of the numerous databases the center offers (about 16), most of which are not offered by our library.  They do have Ancestry Library edition (as we do) and also Find My Past, World Vital Records, MyHeritage.  They are more than a microfilm reading room with all of the database access they offer.
  • 4 authorized computers that allow access to the databases above and the digital microfilms available through the FamilySearch website.
  • 6 microfilm readers
  • a microfilm printer (that I was told does not work for making a copy of an actual microfilm image; make sure you bring your smartphone with digital camera to take pictures of records projected on desktop whiteboard from the microfilm you might be using.)
  • Making paper copies of digital images from digital microfilms is FREE.
  • Bring your Flashdrive to download images from the digital microfilms for viewing at home in addition to printing them there.
  • Access to the computers is “first come first serve”; no reservations; call in advance to ask if any computers are open.
  • Don’t forget to sign in on the “Sign-In” sheet.

OK.   So how was my visit??

First things first.  I called in to check they were open.  A volunteer picked up the phone and confirmed they were open.  I went to the facility. Parked in the back. Rang the bell to be buzzed in and nothing happened.  Re-rang over and over. Had to call in to the center again to let them know I was at the back awaiting to be let in.  Finally got in.  Oh well, they were busy helping others inside or they just did not hear the buzzer!  No problem!

Upon entering the FHC room I noticed that much of what I remember there still looked the same except the number of microfilm readers was reduced.  The room looked more open with fewer microfilm readers.

I noticed that two of our genealogy program participants were also busily engaged on the computers.  I guess I had a good influence on them encouraging visits to the FHC, especially now with the availability of the digital microfilms.  However, here is what I see as a developing problem.  The center has 4 computers.  All 4 computers were being used.  If anyone else came in during the time I was there I think they would have been out of luck to use a computer.  More and more access to the digital images is only available in the FHC.  Sounds to me like it is possible the computers will be in very great demand now more than before.  So plan accordingly to use the facility and its resources.

I brought a list with me from the Poznan Marriage Project in Poland that has identified many KIERNA names that have been viewed in the LDS microfilms by Polish volunteers and transcribed into the project.  I calculated what LDS microfilm I needed to view, entered in the town name for the records and saw a list of these films appear.  At home I did receive the message on the screen that viewing the data was only available within the FHC.  I clicked on the film number.  And the data appeared on the screen only in the FHC for me to find a certain marriage record for a certain year based on the Poznan search I did.

My purpose of viewing the image for my great-grandfather and great-grandmother’s marriage record was to see if their parents’ names were mentioned or were they omitted from capturing during transcribing in the Poznan project.  Unfortunately, the Poznan project results were accurate.  There was no name mentioned in the microfilm image of who the parents were for my g-grandparents.  I was disappointed nonetheless.  But at least I knew the data was not there in the original record.

I wound up downloading to my flashdrive at least 5 images of these marriage records that were not available for me to see from home from the digital data where they resided.  I have more clues to analyze but I did not hit a home run or have a “Happy Dance” moment!!

The 2 hours that I was there went by in a flash.  Soon I was out the door with at least some data I previously did not have.

It felt good going to the FHC I had not visited much recently.  I now have a better understanding about the mechanics of how the process works there.

If you have never been to the Schaumburg Family Center, you may want to drop in during the hours I mentioned above to see what they are all about.  Even if you are not using digital microfilm data, check out the databases they have when you visit their web site.  Most of what they have are databases that we do not have at our library.

Happy researching at the Schaumburg FHC!

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

FamilySearch Announcement To Discontinue Provisioning Of Microfilms Effective September 1, 2017

Hi Everyone!

By now all of you should have heard of the announcement by FamilySearch that effective September 1, 2017 they will no longer be providing microfilms upon request for your use at a Family History Center (FHC) or to a designated Family History Library Affiliate like a public library that is participating with FamilySearch.

If you have actively been submitting requests for microfilm data then this will dramatically affect you as of September 1, 2017.  If you need to order any new microfilms from FamilySearch that have not yet been digitized you have got to get your requests in for processing NOW.

How do you know if it has been digitized?

You will need to search their catalog, generally by “place name” to find films of interest to you (e.g Wawelno, Bydgoszcz, Poland or Bloomingdale, DuPage, Illinois).  You will look at the catalog entry for the film of interest, click on the links to get you to the most information, look on the right side of the screen where you will see your film number of interest.  If an icon of a “camera” is next to the film number, this means the film is in digital format.  If you see an icon of a “microfilm” this means the film has not yet been digitized and is still available to order as a microfilm before September 1, 2017.

FamilySearch Link To Films Showing Digitized Icon Of “Camera” And Digitized Icon of “Microfilm”

FamilySearch believes that its conversion to digital media has been so successful that it feels comfortable to move forward to discontinue supplying microfilms as of September 1, 2017.  Material that is currently in microfilm format that has been digitized will become accessible via the Family History Center.  In other words, you previously ordered a microfilm and may have had it delivered to a local Family History Center or Affiliate for viewing by yourself.  After September 1, 2017 you will no longer need to order a microfilm if it has already been digitized.  You simply find the film number of interest to you in the FamilySearch online catalog of films and check to see if it has been digitized by seeing if you see an icon for a “camera”.  If yes, and you click on the link for the film number, you may see a screen message that pops up noting that to view the film digitally you will need to go to a Family History Center.

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So basically this is no different from what you were doing before needing to go to a Family History Center or Affiliate.

FamilySearch Link To Films Showing Digitized Icon Of “Camera” That Can Only Be Viewed At A Family History Center (4th Digital “Camera” Icon Down) 

However, even with the great progress that has been made by FamilySearch to digitize the films, there will still be a targeted 3 year period until 2020 while FamilySearch finishes digitizing those films that have not yet been completed.

What does this truly mean for you?

It means that if you need a particular microfilm for viewing that has not yet been digitized  (icon of a “microfilm”) and is not available for viewing online at a Family History Center, you can order it now before September 1, 2017 for delivery to a local Family History Center or Affiliate (like a library that is deemed as such e.g. Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Palatine Public Library, Algonquin Public Library and many more in our local area).

If you do not order it before September 1, 2017 then you may simply have to be patient over the next three years awaiting the conversion of that film to digital format for viewing online at a local Family History Center.

I actually found films of interest to me that I can view anywhere online without having to go to a Family History Center.  These films are digital and there are no contractual restrictions for viewing from any location through FamilySearch.

FamilySearch Link To Film Showing Digitized Icon Of “Camera” (Film Viewable Online Anywhere)

I believe FamilySearch will simply transition films that are currently viewable digitally only in a Family History Center to having these films available for viewing through any device without having to go to a Family History Center where contractual obligations allow such viewing from anywhere.

There could still be many digital films that will not be viewable from any location other than a Family History Center.

If you are an “online only” researcher and don’t even know what a FamilySearch microfilm is then there is no affect on your research (just please don’t tell me you are an “only online” researcher!).  You will still be doing your research through whatever subscriptions for online searching you have or free sites you use.

If you are a user of FamilySearch microfilms still, get your final orders in for microfilms before September 1, 2017.

If you are doing online research, make sure you use the FamilySearch online catalog  (FamilySearch Online Catalog) to find locations of interest to you to see what they have available to you that you can still order as a microfilm, view digital data anywhere, or view digital data only through a local Family History Center (not an Affiliate).

Let us hope that much of what is noted for digital viewing today for a good amount of films only at a local Family History Center becomes more readily available for viewing anywhere and not tied in to a local Family History Center.

I will keep all of you informed as future developments occur regarding this major change in the world of FamilySearch microfilms.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

 

 

 

 

Handout From July 11, 2017 Ginger Frere “Using Timelines” Program Presentation Available As A PDF In This Post

Hi Everyone!

Ginger Frere

Just want to let you know that Ginger Frere, our genealogy program speaker from our recently held July 11, 2017 program, has given me permission to post her program handout from “Using Timelines to Break Down Brick Walls”.

Thank you Ginger!

For those that were unable to attend last night’s program, you can see what some of the tips are to use timelines in your genealogy research.

Here is the handout:

July 11, 2017 “Using Timelines to Break Down Brick Walls” Program Handout

Enjoy the handout.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, Author, Genealogy Speaker And Well-Known German Genealogy Specialist, Is Now Authoring A Blog Through Her Website

Hi Everyone!

You heard me mention at our last night’s genealogy program that Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, a genealogy program speaker who has spoken many times at our library, has indicated to me that she has just started authoring a blog through her genealogy business website.

Teresa is a renowned specialist in Germanic genealogy research.  Her blog will contain posts related to German genealogy topics as well as Chicago genealogy topics, another specialty area of hers.

I strongly recommend taking a look at the posts at Teresa’s new blog if you are focusing on German genealogy research or Chicago genealogy research.

You can find her genealogy business website called Lind Street Research at:

Teresa Steinkamp McMillin Lind Street Research

Her  blog can be found at one of the home page tabs on top or you can go directly to the blog from the below link:

Teresa Steinkamp McMillin  Lind Street Research Blog

Take a look at it.  She just recently started it.  Her Germanic oriented posts and the Chicago posts might just shed some insight into areas related to your own research.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Program Handouts Uploaded As A PDF for July 11, 2017 Genealogy Program

Hi Everyone!

I have added the July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Program Handouts as a PDF file into the PROGRAM HANDOUTS Category on the right sidebar of the blog.

Here is a direct link to the July 2017 Handouts for your convenience:

July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Program Handouts

Take a look at it if you choose to browse through it in advance of our Genealogy Program that will take place on Tuesday evening, July 11, 2017 at 7:30 PM at our main library location at 130 S. Roselle Road in Schaumburg, IL.

You can read the handouts online or you can save them as a PDF file to your own computer for reading offline and more detailed searching through all of the contents.

You will also note that I  “highlight” in this uploaded PDF key points within the handout  by using  the “yellow highlighting” function within Microsoft Word.  This will allow your eyes to visually see key points within the handouts that I want to emphasize.  I hope you will enjoy being able to more easily see these key points within the set of handouts through this highlighting technique.  I plan on highlighting within the Handout file on a going forward basis.

Please note that the Handouts PDF file has embedded Bookmarks to allow you to move to the handouts of interest to you quickly without having to scroll through the entire document.  Just open the Bookmark window in the PDF file and select the handout of interest for quick access.

You can also get to the handouts of interest to you quickly via the Table of Contents at the beginning of the document.  You will find hyperlinks that will get you directly to the handout of interest to you from the Table of Contents.

Please note that you can access directly any and all URL Links that you find within the Handouts PDF.  You can get directly to the website being mentioned from within the handout being mentioned.

Enjoy the handouts.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Newsletter Uploaded As A PDF for July 11, 2017 Genealogy Program

Hi Everyone!

I have added the July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Newsletter as a PDF file into the NEWSLETTER Category on the right sidebar of the blog.

Here is a direct link to the July 2017 Newsletter for your convenience:

July 2017 Schaumburg Township District Library Genealogy Newsletter

Take a look at it if you choose to browse through it in advance of our Genealogy Program that will take place on Tuesday evening, July 11, 2017 at 7:30 PM at our main library location at 130 S. Roselle Road in Schaumburg, IL.

You can read the newsletter online or you can save it as a PDF file to your own computer for reading offline and more detailed searching through all of the contents.

Please note that the Newsletter has Bookmarks and Hyperlinks within the document to make for fast navigation from within the Table of Contents.  You can quickly get to the spots that interest you from the Table of Contents.

Enjoy the newsletter.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library

Reminder: Our Next Genealogy Program at STDL Is Tomorrow July 11, 2017

Hi Everyone!

I thought I would post this reminder of our next upcoming Genealogy Program at the Schaumburg Township District Library.

There is no pre-registration required in order to attend the program.  There is no fee charged to attend.  Anyone can attend this program.  You do not have to be a library card holder with the Schaumburg Township District Library in order to attend.

Here are the details of our upcoming program for Tuesday evening, July 11, 2017:

Ginger Frere

Come early to review genealogical materials. At 7:45 p.m. Ginger Frere, MLIS, MBA, explains how to use timelines to solve genealogical problems.

Ginger Frere is a professional researcher who provides a variety of research services to authors, professional historians, film makers and individuals interested in genealogy. Her primary research interests include Chicago history and the creation of online tools for genealogists. She was one of the driving forces behind the development of ChicagoAncestors.org. Ginger is a Newberry Scholar-in-Residence and a regular instructor in Chicago’s Newberry Library Adult Education seminar program. Ginger has attended the National Institute on Genealogical Research, the Samford Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, and the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh. She is a member of the Chicago Genealogical Society, the Illinois Genealogical Society, the National Genealogical Society and the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Doors will open at approximately 7 p.m. so you can pick-up handouts, review books and journals, and network with other participants. Tony Kierna will start the program at 7:30 p.m. with introductions of new participants and a brief review of handouts and genealogical matters.

For further information contact Tony Kierna at 847-923-3390.

Tony Kierna
Genealogy Coordinator
Schaumburg Township District Library